4 Steps To Create A High Demand For Your Coaching

If you’re honest with yourself, you know this. . .  When most people prioritize where to put their hard-earned money, coaching is not high on the list. So why are you trying to convince people to buy it?

There’s a better way to get clients. I’ll lay out the four steps below, but it all starts with finding out what people will put their money into. And in order to find out what people will pay a coach for, you have to know which people you are talking about.

Trust me, there are plenty of people out there who are eager to invest in professional services for a specific purpose. Finding them, and finding out what they are after, is the art of target marketing.

I’ve seen over and over how the clients start flowing in when coaches target a viable coaching market. And the kicker is, targeting a viable market significantly reduces the amount of marketing your business needs. Why?

  • It’s quick and easy to learn about the people in a narrow market — what makes them tick, what they want in life, what’s missing for them. And suddenly, you have the keys to the most powerful and effective marketing.
  • Your business becomes client centric. The more you build everything in your business around what you know about your prospects, the more your business connects with them where they live.

Have you ever come across a service that seems like it’s designed for you? The service provider is speaking your language, understands what you want so well that it’s a no brainer. You’ll invest, right? And you’ll tell other people about it, too. That’s what target marketing does for you as a coach.

Will Your Coaching Niche Go the Distance?

When you try to sell a coaching specialty (transition coaching, career coaching, relationship coaching) or you target a market that’s too broad, it’s very difficult to generate sustainable demand for your services. Your specialty may be valuable, and exciting to you, but attracting paying clients will be an uphill battle.

If you target women in transition, for example, you’re trying to appeal to too many diverse situations and populations. Consider the values, interests and challenges of women graduating from college, versus women entering retirement. Trying to cover all those angles won’t engender credibility or trust. And it leaves you competing with anyone who markets to women at any stage of life. That’s fierce competition!

You can tell your coaching niche is too broad when:

  • You’re working extremely hard, unable to leverage your efforts and struggling to meet your financial goals.
  • Each time you market, it feels like starting over.
  • It’s hard to think of something new to say in ezines or blog posts.
  • You quickly run out of ways to connect with groups of people in your market.

But when you choose a viable coaching market:

  • It’s easy to get in front of 100 or more people in your market every month.
  • You can quickly become an expert in your market.
  • You’ll get pre-qualified referral business from your current clients.
  • You’ll be able to charge high prices for your coaching.

Build a Client Centric Coaching Business

Here’s one of the top reasons I have so much juice for helping coaches succeed — because the most successful coaches are the ones who do the most good. They are the ones who are working at their full potential and reaching the most people.

Building any successful business is hard work. It takes loads of talent and grit. So don’t make it harder than it needs to be. The best way I know to give your coaching business every advantage, is to make it client centric. That means:

  1. Choose a viable coaching market.
  2. Find out what matters most to those people — the goals they really care about and the obstacles that keep tripping them up.
  3. Design your coaching programs around what your market is motivated to invest in.
  4. When you market — when you communicate what you are offering — use language your market will understand.

None of this is rocket science, but it does help to walk through it with someone who has been there before. That’s exactly what my system called Your Highly Profitable Niche does for you. Check it out.

  • Kenn

    “Client Centric” … that's is the winning phrase.

    For many coaches (and just the same for professionals who love what they do including me), there are two sides to the business:

    1 – The skills side – in this case coaching
    2 – The needs side – which is what the clients want help with

    The client's more quickly and excitedly will respond to their side (needs), which is why your coaching business should center around client needs – or be “client centric.”

    Well said Rhonda.

    • I'll go one step further with the two sides, as I really like that distinction — more than needs it's wants. People will buy what they want more than what they need sometimes, especially for a service like coaching. For example, they may need balance but are unlikely to invest in that, but if they can get solutions to tangible problems they are willing to invest in, they will also receive support for what they need from the coach. As coaches, we need to enroll the client before we can offer them our many coaching tools and processes.

  • So true! So true! Thanks for sharing so eloquently.

  • Rhonda
    Nice post. I have said for years to grow your service business, any business not just coaching, you only have to do 2 things: 1) create great relationships and 2) do great work. If people can do both, they have a great shot at being a successful service entrepreneur.

  • Elizabeth Lord

    What a wonderful blog. I feel as though you are speaking to me. Very readable and professional.

  • Monique Davis

    Very nice article, i love to read it.

  • Perfect timing! I recently started coaching and am presenting it as law of attraction life coaching, which I now see as way, way too broad. I did this targeting when I had a greeting card business–I targeted residential realtors within 25 miles of my office, joined their groups, read their magazines, really got immersed in their business and was therefore more effective. Don't know why it had not occurred to me in my coaching practice. Thanks SO much for waking me up!

    • There you go. I hope target marketing will save you years of heartache trying to sell law of attraction coaching. Wondering if realtors could be your market since you already know them well and know their publications etc.

  • I totally agree with this, but I find that it is easier said than done. I'm totally convinced on the idea of choosing and marketing to a particular niche. However, trying to pick a viable niche that helps me fulfill my life's purpose of “helping women create wealth” has been an elusive goal. I've gone through 4 niches in the past year. (First, it was professionals in the healing industry, 2nd was women in corporate America, 3rd was all entrepreneurial and career women who want to build wealth.) My latest one is female sales professionals, but who knows how long till I feel like not enough people in that group wants to pay for coaching or that it's not specific enough. So, for me, the task is easier said then done.

    • Hi Rose, you're right — it takes more than choosing a viable market to get a steady stream of clients. You must also find out what they're willing to buy and to offer that. That's easier than it sounds and part of what I teach in my Ideal Coaching Market workshop. http://idealcoachingmarket.com Once you position your services as essential people will afford your services. When they say they can't or won't pay for it, it's usually because they haven't yet felt the connection between what you're offering and what they want (and will pay for).

  • Hi Rose, you're right — it takes more than choosing a viable market to get a steady stream of clients. You must also find out what they're willing to buy and to offer that. That's easier than it sounds and part of what I teach in my Ideal Coaching Market workshop. http://idealcoachingmarket.com Once you position your services as essential people will afford your services. When they say they can't or won't pay for it, it's usually because they haven't yet felt the connection between what you're offering and what they want (and will pay for).